News Flash Home
The original item was published from 5/26/2020 5:43:42 PM to 6/7/2020 12:00:00 AM.

News Flash

News & Town Board Reports (gblist)

Posted on: May 26, 2020

[ARCHIVED] Last week ANOTHER motorcyclist lost his life in Greenburgh=be careful

last week another motorcyclist lost his life in our town -on Dobbs Ferry Road. Please be careful if you are motorcyclist or driver. We want you alive!





 LAST WEEK A MOTORCYCLIST LOST HIS LIFE ON DOBBS FERRY ROAD PLEASE -MOTORCYCLISTS AND MOTORISTS- BE CAREFUL --WE DON’T TO SEE MORE MOTORCYCLISTS LOSE THEIR LIVES
Every year since 2004 over 4000 people have died in motorcycle accidents. There have been some years when more than 5000 motorcyclists died.  Last week we experienced another motorcycle accident in Greenburgh. It wasn’t the first.  A few years ago a motorcyclist died in front of Greenburgh Town Hall. Friends continue to place flowers at that location.

At approximately 6:00 PM on Tuesday May 19th, 2020 Greenburgh PD police and EMS units responded to the area of 106 Dobbs Ferry Road for a report of a motor vehicle accident with injuries, involving a car and a motorcycle. The motorcyclist, a 21 year old male, was transported to Westchester Medical Center by ambulance. Unfortunately, he was subsequently pronounced dead at the hospital. The operator of the automobile remained on scene after the accident. Greenburgh Police Department detectives responded to the scene and conducted an accident investigation. Their investigation is ongoing. Anyone that witnessed the accident is asked to contact the Greenburgh Police Department Detective Division at 914-989-1732. 




MOTORCYCLE SAFETY CONCERNS--FROM THE STANDPOINT OF MOTORCYCLE SAFETY FOUNDATION

Over half of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle. Many times, the car or truck driver, not the motorcyclist, is at fault. There are a lot more cars and trucks than motorcycles on the road, and some drivers don’t "recognize" a motorcycle – they ignore it (usually unintentionally). 2. Because of its narrow profile, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car’s blind spots (door/roof pillars) or masked by objects or backgrounds outside a car (bushes, fences, bridges, etc). Take an extra moment to look for motorcycles, whether you’re changing lanes or turning at intersections. 3. Because of its small size, a motorcycle may look farther away than it is. It may also be difficult to judge a motorcycle’s speed. When checking traffic to turn at an intersection or into (or out of) a driveway, predict a motorcycle is closer than it looks. 4. Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or merely rolling off the throttle, thus not activating the brake light. Allow more following distance, say 3 or 4 seconds. At intersections, predict a motorcyclist may slow down without visual warning. 5. Motorcyclists often adjust position within a lane to be seen more easily and to minimize the effects of road debris, passing vehicles, and wind. Understand that motorcyclists adjust lane position for a purpose, not to be reckless or show off or to allow you to share the lane with them. 6. Turn signals on a motorcycle usually are not self-canceling, thus some riders (especially beginners) sometimes forget to turn them off after a turn or lane change. Make sure a motorcycle’s signal is for real. 7. Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle’s better characteristics, especially at slower speeds and with good road conditions, but don’t expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way. 8. Stopping distance for motorcycles is nearly the same as for cars, but slippery pavement makes stopping quickly difficult. Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because you can’t always stop "on a dime." 9. When a motorcycle is in motion, see more than the motorcycle – see the person under the helmet, who could be your friend, neighbor, or relative. 


TIPS FOR MOTORCYCLISTS (from Geico)

WEAR A HELMET WITH A FACE SHIELD OR PROTECTIVE EYE WEAR

Wear protective gear

Follow traffic rules-don’t speed --the faster you go the longer it will take to stop.  Some accidents in the past involved speeding and carelessness.

Ride Defensively--Don’t assume that a driver can see you, as nearly two thirds of all motorcycle accidents are caused by a driver violating a riders’s right of way. You should always ride with your headlights on; stay out of a driver’s blind spot; signal well in advance of any change in direction; and watch for turning vehicles;

Be awake and drive sober

Keep your riding skills honed through education: complete a formal riding education program; get licensed and take riding courses from time to time to develop riding techniques and to sharpen your street riding strategies

Make sure your motorcycle is fit  for the road. Check tires, look for signs of oil or gas leaks, test for high and low beams -headlights, tailight and signals and check hydraulic and coolant fluids.

Check horn, brakes, mirrors, cluth and throttle


Be careful. We want you alive

PAUL FEINER

Facebook Twitter Email

Other News in News & Town Board Reports (gblist)

Bed Bath Beyond closing Elmsford store

Posted on: January 30, 2023

AARP TAX PREP - FREE

Posted on: January 27, 2023

Avoid Late Property Tax Penalties

Posted on: January 19, 2023

Home heating sales tax suspended -

Posted on: January 12, 2023